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in our locality, every dollar we spend at a community health clinic that is community based and emphasizes prevention of disease and trauma are dollars we take away from giant corporations, and we reduce their sales. that's called the strategy of displacement. now, we have tens of billions of dollars in these community economies going on now. yes magazine, how many of you have heard of yes magazine? they chronicle this very well around the country. but we need hundreds and hundreds of billions of dollars of displacement money away from giant organizations whose strings are pulled far from our community be who can shut down and abandon our communities in place of community economies who are rooted in the community are not going the shut down and go to china. they're not going to start speculating with your money was they was -- because they have to face you every day. they're not in some skyscraper in london, new york, chicago or tokyo. community economies, another solution. the third is giving science and technology back to the people. look at all the science and technology
in the battle of 1812 and was less than one-half of 1% of all servicemen. many that served serve the local militia that for actual by contrast 617,000 combatants died in the civil war just to give you a sense of the difference in scale that we are talking about. statistics like these hint that the meaning of the war of 1812 can be found as much in popular print, and newspapers, books and about what telling about the war as it can be found in the battlefields themselves. contrast those numbers of service men with numbers on newspapers in. they produce approximately 250 different newspaper titles to the weekly messenger. that's about one newspaper franchise for every ten men who died in battle how many issues of each volume, how many actual newspaper franchisees there were if you want to assess the impact and the importance of the war of 1812. in 1812 americans took instructions about patriotism from a flood of popular print. a wash in discussions about national law of. from political speeches like madison to the tavern ballots and folk songs and the treatises and political economies to popu
. that was less than one half of 1% of all servicemen. many who served served in local militias and had a service that was more ceremonial than actual. by contrast 617,000 combatants died in the civil war just to give you a sense of the difference in scale we're talking about. statistics like these hint that the meaning of the war of 1812 can be found as much in popular prints, in newspapers, books and ballads telling about the war as it can be found in the battlefields themselves. contrast those numbers of servicemen with fwhum members on newspapers. between 1812 and 1815 the nation's presses produced approximately 250 different newspaper titles, from the south carolina state gazette to the kentucky telegraph to the massachusetts weekly messenger. that is one newspaper franchise for every 10 men who died in battle. we're not talking about how many volumes of the newspapers were published weekly or monthly during that period. how many issues of each volume. we're talking about how many actual difficult newspaper franchises there were, quite a few. so if we truly want to assess the impact and the
-half of 1% of all servicemen. many served and local militias in the service was more ceremonial. the 617,000 combatants died in the civil war. to give you the difference. the meeting of the war of the war of 1812 can be found in popular print of newspapers and books telling about the war as in the battle field. contrast those servicemen with those in the newspapers. between 1812 and 1815 producing approximately 250 different newspaper titles from south carolina gazette gazette, a kentucky telegraph, a massachusetts week the messenger. one newspaper franchise for every 10 men. not how many were published monthly or weekly but how many different franchises there were. if we went to assess of the war of 1812 we need to evaluate it as a cultural event as much as cultural. americans took instructions from popular print a discussion about national law of. the political speeches like madison's from folks songs to popular novels, plays, americans on every side proved eager to talk about love of country. that may have been dismissed as a waste of time and money as if not a disastrous displays hub
. the streets are lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing at his memorial service as a method in church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout and a local boy scout by collecting pens and paper and sent them to matthew's unit in afghanistan. a dear friend, jim bunn who is involved in media had a vision and the matthew freeman project again. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film that launched the project on memorial day 2010. since then, with the help of so many volunteers, he can't name them all, the project has spent over seven tons of school supplies to soldiers are buried for humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthew small town of richmond hill, now a city of savanna and our great army bases at fort stewart and hunter army airfield in savanna air guard to help me heal by supporting the matthew freeman project under it all veterans day 5-k run for peace. last night i dedicated a memorial in our town, the captain matthew freeman project proudly announced a new scholarship we will be starting for the siblings o
in a pool of blood. the local authorities came up and wanted to know whether we wanted to press charges. we said no, we believe in peace and nonviolence. that was may 9, 1961. in february 09, less than a month after president barack obama had been inaugurated as president and another man that has attacked us came to the congressional office here on capitol hill and said i'm one of the people that beat you. will you forgive me? i want to apologize. his son had been encouraging to see killed the people that he had attacked. i said yes i accept your apology. i forgive you. his son started crying and he started crying, i started crying. he gave me a hug and i hugged him back. i have seen him three of her times. he called me brother and i called him brother. that is what the movement was about, reconciliation. this book is about reconciliation. [applause] we are one people, we are one family, we are one house. we must be reconciled. of those of us who live here in america, those of us who live here on this piece of real estate were born to live together as brothers and sisters. the late a. phili
and a half years to my old high school after having been elected to the local governing authority, it wounded me. when i submitted opinion piece after opinion piece for media publication and couldn't get a single break, it was tough. for years, these matters festered and disappointed. that's just the way my country is. that australia, i have learned to accept it. do you want to know something? today, today, my books sit on the self-on-- shelf of the u.s. library of congress, the largest library in the world. today -- [applause] today, high schools right across the nation, from east to west, from north to south, fill my e-mail inbox with speaking requests. today, my message of inspiration is broadcast into the living rooms of over 100 million households right across the continental united states. that's what happens when you put your mind to something. that's what happens when your audience is open and disinterested in reputation or conformity and committed to intrijism and the act of being bold. today, the idolized american can count friends on just one hand. uncompromising and simplistic con
. the next summer did not show up, did not given notice. i went to the local captain and said where's my summer job. he said, you know you're supposed to vote if you want to work for the machine. i voted. yes, we know. you're supposed to vote a straight ticket. >> i voted the straight ticket. >> but you forgot one. how did you know that? we have ways of knowing. they opened the ballot and to track of who voted for whom, and if you did not vote the right way you did not get the job. that is the chicago way. the president, need not remind you, from chicago and was an active part in the daley machine yes. >> brand in the quarters. what are your thoughts about the original lan3 >> brand in the quarters. what are your thoughts about the original land requirements and the constitution and talks about returning to that? >> i'm sorry, the original? >> the land requirement to vote. >> in the united states constitution. >> wasn't that in there? >> can you send it to me? some states have property laws. some states have laws that said you had to own property. >> okay. state constitutions. >> well, y
from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing at his memorial service at the midwestist church that helped raced him. a local boy execute troop clenchinged pencils and papers and sent them to afghanistan. jim had a vision and the matthew freeman project began. he dedicated time and energy to produce a short film that launched the project on memorial day, 2010. the project has sent over seven tons of supplies to our marines in afghanistan for human tear efforts. matthew's city, and our great arm would bases, and the savannah air guard, have helped me heal by supporting the math few freeway -- freeman project, and the 5k run for peace. last night i dedicated a memorial in our town, to captain matthew freeman joe jacket proudly announced the scholarship we're starting for the siblings of the fallen in combat. these are the forgotten mourners who sacrifice or post opinion their own education to help family. very few people know about gold star families. these are parents, siblings, thousands, children, who survived the death of their loved one. as the mother of a fallen mari
organized deals or unions private armies and local militia were summoned to a breakup strikes and demonstrations often with volleys of rifle fire. as one explain the social order of the time, the perplexing question why one man should be strong, happy, and prosperous and another week, afflicted, and distressed may be entered by the suggestion that the purpose was to teach the power of human endurance and the ability of a life of struggle. well, according to the courts a workers only right was to negotiate man-to-man and take himself elsewhere when terms are not to his liking and then marry the boss's daughter. atop the social order the robber barons flaunted their aristocratic aspirations by dressing up like 18th-century european royalty, spectacular parties, a chorus girls jump of cakes and hang diamond colors on their stocks. the greatest, they were uninhibitedly from 08 in their misconduct. drooling, eating and drinking incredible amounts. they sometimes seemed to avoid a shame, manners, and morals and in the ethics of let me. well, the barron's also control legal establish
in and around the city of fairfax. the local town hall and our historic stage, and the city of fairfax regional library. for the past two years, our brand-new sure what community center. we are proud. we are proud of the "fall for the book festival." it is now my honor to introduce to you our special guest for you. neil gaiman was born in the united kingdom and now lives near minneapolis. he was born and raised in public libraries. he credits laggards of fostering his love of reading. he began his writing career in england as a journalist. his first book was a durand durand biography that took him three months to write. the second was a biography of douglas adams don't panic. the official hitchhikers guide to the galaxy companion. excuse me. this groundbreaking series sandman-- [applause] >> selected a large number of u.s. awards and 75 issue run. >> is at city hall today and one woman said that i have every single one of those. including three harvey awards. in 1991, sandman became the first comic ever to receive a literary award. it won an award for the best short story. mr. neil gaiman is cr
shopping together. booktv troubled just outside to hear from colby college professor and local author lotus the tayler. she talks about her book the virgin warrior the life-and-death of joan of arc. >> i wasn't very interested in the beginning at all. she was too much of an anomaly that went off to fight in the 100 year war and then i saw some films in 1999 some bad ones and so good ones that made me think she could be more interesting than i thought. so i realize looking in the library that were more sources about joan of arc than almost any figure in putting kings and queens. it's a typical portrayal of her is someone who is just a force of god or a force of the st and when i started reading the documents, because we ought not only have her own voice in the trial but we of the villagers that she fought with that testify to 25 years after her death about her and these were not only for us is that were completely silent in the historical average, and talked about her and for example the villagers in particular would say things like she didn't want to dance with us. we made fun of her lot. a
cable to explore the local lyric, and historical atmosphere. >> read a friday, i think you people because of stephen king that people who enjoy reading his books and show people that like reading about the small town try to but i think we also like nonfiction stories about their state. people similar and i think they want to read stories about states that are landlocked. i'm not sure the typical reader, if i would see anything, their people to want a good story, you know? and not a pretentious story. you often see people in maine that have, may be wealthy but they will wear flannel shirts but they don't show off their wealth. i think people, if i could say anything about stories, they want people that are true, not flashy or showy. i can see them relating to the story about a simple, you know, simple people who go about their lives. i think the writers in maine, they take from what they know. i think writers will write about memoirs, families, historical things that happen in maine whether it's more about the sea and our connection to -- maine has a great fishing tradition as well
per prayer. in addition november members may have any further contact with a local bob. this has nothing to do with downsizing. it is incumbent to bring the spirit of the measures curb wastefulness and it occur at efficiency bravura not tired doing -- during that time you could so wallets. think of show and tell to acquire. daddy won the longer use a dry credit-card to buy a executives president's -- presents that are not money. and this will not -- spare us but consequence to have daddy number four. we're certain everyone will work as a team to return the hunters and household to their previous state of fiscal stability. if you have any idea the boxes in the kitchen. thank you very much. [applause] rear opened for questions. c-span has the roving microphone. let the guy hit you in the face and we will answer your question. don't be shy. quickly in beijing. when they sang children are our future. you are the children. this is the future. >> somebody does not like the rules. some account is canada justify its relationship with great britain? the last time i checked you are still t
tv, american history tv and c-span local content vehicles with behind-the-scenes at the history of literary life of augusta, maine and noon eastern on booktv on c-span2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> michael grunwald presents his thoughts on the $800 billion stimulus bill, the american recovery reinvestment act signed into law by president obama on february 17, 2009. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thanks, all of you, for coming and braving the rain. i am thrilled to start by 4 in new york. my wonderful parents are here. the only new yorkers who go to florida to visit their grandchildren. there are a lot of facts and figures and fun characters and colorful stories. i knew it was going to be controversial and it would be revisionist history of the obama stimulus and everybody hates the obama stimulus. obama he did too. a year after it passed a percentage of americans who believe the stimulus created jobs was lower than the percentage of americans who believe elvis was alive. at one point i told the story how obama told his cabinet that the stimulus was
, to a service economy which shifted much more towards smaller local plumbers, doctors, lawyers, you name it, too much more of an innovation-based economy where innovators created very large breakthroughs that have really propelled our economy. those are the risks that drive the economy. forward. >> host: this earth can expect in terms of middle-class risk to the notion of redeployment of labor -- >> guest: i know what is going to see. the whole economy has grown risky and riskier in his foundation. and innovation-based economy is riskier than one that is exploiting the mass market. and that risk has been pushed out only to investors, which it has in part, it's also been pushed to employees. we don't have defined benefit contributions anymore. people of all areas and and things like that. they are much more prone to being laid off in a recession than they were in the past. there's much more risk that i like the entire economy. and it's been pushed off to everybody. we also -- we also say would it be nice to go back to the 1950s, and have an economy that was less risky, or we could push it all off
registration. in terms of the mandatory voting its its local question and i think other countries do have mandatory voting just like the jury service or some people have to serve in the military in the compulsory service. one problem with it is i think we have a culture of liberty here in this country. so if we have mandatory voting i certainly think we would want to have a none of the above option so that people could exercise it. politically though we don't know if it is realistic. i think a lot of people would resist it. as opposed to the need for something that is unrealistic writing we should really focus on how do we make boating accessible to people so that as many people as possible participate. >> would you teacher the george washington university? >> i teach the voting rights and a lot now in terms of campaign finance. you know, we had a citizens united decision which allows corporations to spend on politics. we also recently had the opinion by the supreme court striking down a public financing program in arizona. and my kind of new version of campaign finance is that we shouldn
to see more from our recent visit to agusta, maine. for more information visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> next on booktv education activists jonathan kozol talks about inner-city children he followed since the age of 6 to 18-year-old. he examines the economic and educational obstacles each child has face as they progress through their school system. it is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thanks, tom and thanks as always to my absolutely favorite bookstore in america, politics and prose. i love that books for. [applause] and thanks to each and every one of you for being here. i am particularly glad to the with so many friends tonight. i don't mean with some double meaning, i just mean friends old and new. some of my oldest friends in the audience. it means a great deal to me because to -- tomorrow is my birthday. i will be all alone on an airplane going through six hours to some place i haven't checked the schedule yet, i think it is something like portland, ore. or san diego. united airlines is not going to give me any pr
more from a recent visit to maine. for more information on other cities visited go to c-span.org/local content. antonio mendez presents "argo" in washington, d.c.,ed. it details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia officer antonio mendez posing as a hollywood producer scouting out location for a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." it's about thirty minutes. if we can have nerve the back come on. thank you for your patience. we have -- the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block here was horrendous. apparently thank you, people are nodding. that's good. thank you very much. so there may be some people held up still. we'll welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter, the executive directer. ly ask you as a court sei those who are recording the program and the speakers to be kind enough to turn off your cell phone, pda and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. that said we'll go ahead and come up an
as we visit with local authors and explore special collections that help tell the history of not only this state but the country as well. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine and it's significant to the story of uncle tom's cabin. in many plays places stories began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23 that harriet beecher stowe by her account saw a vision of uncle tom dean clips to death. now uncle tom, as you probably know, is the title, the hero of her 1852 novel, uncle tom's cabin and the story of uncle tom's cabin is that there was a slave, a very very good slave who was sold by his first time owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him in order to pay a debt on his plantation. through a series of misadventures you might say, he ends up in the hands of a very unruly owner who is so irritated by him and his goodness, that he whips him to death and this is the scene out of which the entire novel in many respects grows. harriet beecher stowe came from a family, a very religious family, the beach or's who are located in ohio where she grew up and they were a highly reli
. think about your local college professor. the driver of that crazy car with all of the bumper stickers on the back of the car. you get the picture, right? they dominate professions lead a cultural imprint in this great country of ours. professionalism, journalism, academia, and the music industry, and america's fastest-growing brand of entertainers, cirque du soleil acrobats. who are these people that call themselves liberals? and how to such a tiny group leave such a big impact on our culture and lives? what motivates them? well, i am in an excellent position to answer these deep questions. because i have been watching liberals closely for over 30 years. i have studied liberals like jane goodall studies are gems. [laughter] in their natural habitats and without judgment. i have broke bread with them, have teased them, and yes, i have even blogged some of them because some of my best friends are liberal and some are even members of my own family. my commitment to understanding liberals sometimes worry that my dear conservative friends. some even question my mental health. but i read in
in the local supermarket, the environmental movement, people who say their -- they are spiritual, but not religious. doctors who prescribe meditation for cardiac patients, the unibomber -- long story. the actual revolution, wayne dire medical marijuana, ecstasy fueled raves, and the whole way we think about life, death, and nature of reality itself. before i, you know -- i can't explain all those in the short talk. that's why you have to buy my book, but here's the bottom line. i mean, millions of people in my generation, and by that i mean the baby boomers, took lsd and other kinds of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s, and we, including myself, had a profoundly enlightening or simultaneously terrifying soul shattering experiences on the drugs that i don't think we all quite really understood in the sense that, sure, we had amazing experiences, perhaps, and these terrifying experiences, but what happened after the ecstasy? you know, how did psychedelic drugs change the way we live our lives? did they make us better people? make us more aware people? to me, that's the important quest
and europe on the other. you have three levels of stalemates, local, regional, and international because there's so much at stake so a country like or regime like syria for the past 40 years had these calculations in mind so this is not to excuse the regime's brutality whatsoever, but to understand analytically that the outcomes of what we have been witnessing for the past several decades involve these kinds of calculations that many of us don't take intoing the. >> host: and we have been talking with professor haddad, the political economy of the authoritarian resilience, published by stanford. he's head of the middle eastern studies program here at george mason university. this is booktv on c-span2. >>> visit booktv.org to watch any of the programs you see here online. type author or book title in the search bar on the upper left side of the page and click "search," and you can share anything you see on booktv.org easily by clicking "share" on the upper left side of the page and selecting the format. booktv streams live online for 48 hours every weekend with top nonfiction books and au
, after having been elected to the local gotching authority, it wounded me. when i submitted opinion piece after opinion piece for media publication and couldn't get a single break, it was tough. for years, these matters festered and disappointed. but that's just the way my country is. that's australia. i have learned to accept it. but you want to know something? today, today, my books sit on the shelf of the u.s. library of congress. the largest library in the world. today -- [applause] -- today high schools right across this nation, from east to west, from north to south, fill my e-mail inbox with speaking requests. today my message of inspiration is being broadcast into the living rooms of over 100 million households, right across the continental united states. that's what happens when you put your mind to something. that's what happens when your audience is open and disinterested in reputation or conformity, and committed to individualism and the act of being bold. today the idealized american can count his true friends on just one hand. uncompromising and simplistic convictions such a
that a beloved local sheriff named deputy steven sorenson had been ambushed at a trailer in a relittle burb near lancaster, where i was visiting mark. it was quite a violent incident, according to the early reports, and by then this is just like an hour or two after we heard the first signs. there were choppers flying out and six or seven different police agencies were converging on the scene. it was a building manhunt, and mark said, sounds like your sort of story. but when joshua trees are involved i'm usually right there. i don't -- even though i do break for sand, much of my work is set in the mojave and the desert is often a main character. i don't do fire reporting, even though this story, desert reckoning, is a giant conflagration, ironically i don't do sign reporting but i guess i just have with this book, which took eight years, by the way. at any rate, we started watching the coverage as it unfolded, and turned out that the two main characters involved were very compelling to me. a dedicated her mitt, donald kueck, who was the suspect in the shooting and had fled after ambushing the sh
mean the focus many things have on local issues, on solving problems where they live is pushing them into the house. there's a real precedents in the country, electing somebody who's only experienced in the house of representatives. it starts all members of the hospice, but but it's got to be the b. team. they don't really know national issues because they are serving just their local constituents. and so, i think there's even one president, except for gerald ford was elected from the house. so women may be in the house, but getting into the house may not get them into the white house. it's going to take governors and senators. >> okay. let's open it to questions and the spirit if you have a question, raise your hand and wait for a microphone to come to you. let's give students a chance to ask. if you've got one, we'll start with you. >> ask if you deal with the issue of women candidates in how you do that. that's a very important image that people have went age and so forth. >> the women in our book all have adult children and they really didn't get into politics in a serious way ot
recent visit to augusta, maine. for more information on this and other cities, visit our local content vehicles, go to c-span.org/local content. here is look at a look at some books that are being published this week. in the book "there was a country", chinua achebe, author of numerous books, including things fall apart, writes an account of the civil war in nigeria from 1967 to 1970. larry berman, author of several books on vietnam profile the commander navy forces in vietnam and the chief of naval operations from 1970 until 1974 in the life of admiral zumwalt. the book "zumwalt." and then political commentators argue that american sovereignty is in jeopardy. a global editor at large argues that with the emergence of new technology markets, a select few have been able to separate themselves into an extremely wealthy group of individuals with unprecedented political and social influence in the book "plutocrats." and david coleman, director of the university of virginia's miller center presidential recordings program, utilizes his eagerly recorded tapes from the kennedy administration t
, booktv traveled just outside augusta to hear from colby college professor and local author larissa taylor. ms. taylor talks about her book, "the virgin warrior: the life and death of joan of arc." >> well, i wasn't very interested in joan of arc at the beginning at all. she seemed to me too much of an anomaly, a teenage girl who went off to fight and changed the 100 years' war. and then i saw some films in 1999, some bad ones and some good ones, but one portrayal really kind of made me think, hmm, this girl could be more interesting than i thought. and is from that i realized there were more original sources from the period about joan of ash k that almost any medieval figure including kings and queens. the typical portrayal of her is someone who is just a force of god or a force of the saints. and when i started reading the documents -- because we not only have her own voice at trial, but we have the villagers, the soldiers she fought with who testified 25 years after her death about her, and these are normally voices that are completely silent in the historical record -- and i the
for her kids to get to school safely on the local level land katzenbaum started on the school board. if you can get within and at that level then you can begin -- they begin to develop their confidence but it is hard for women to see themselves in that position. >> something said at dinner which struck me. is not in the book but should have been in the book perhaps. up until recently, the women who were trying to seek the presidency were symbolic candidates and they recognized they were symbolic candidate. they didn't think they had a chance to win. that has changed. hillary clinton thought she had a chance to win. michele bachman did not quite symbolize anything. once upon a time many african-americans who ran for the presidency also thought of themselves as symbolic and that has changed. perhaps that shift from i am running as a symbol, i am running seriously, has occurred and we are going to see women not just making a gesture but really going after the office. >> one last question and i will open it up to questions and answers from the audience but i'm going to ask one of my sta
. but was not asked back to my school after being elected to the local governing authority. when i submitted opinion piece after opinion piece the media publication could not get a single break. for years these disappointed. that is just the way i have learned to except. do you want to know something? today my book sits on the selwyn -- the shelf of the u.s. library of congress largest library in the world. [applause] in today high-school across the nation north to south minyanville my in box with speaking request. this is being broadcast into the living rooms of 100 million households across the continental united states. that is what happens when the audience is open and committed to individuals. today americans that can count as true friends such as the jule listed believe between good and evil with a witness making the mark demand. clarity is the enemy of the meek. silence of the disagreement is there friend. to them, the contributions are not on the and will come but tim britcom at irritable and inflammatory. from the prairies of illinois to the riverbanks of missouri, there is rightfully no co
liberal. think michael moore, nancy pelosi, think your local college professor. you know, think the driver of the crazy call with all the bush is hitler bumper stickers on the back of the car. [laughter] you know, think the checkout help with the master's degree in gender studies wearing a head band at your local whole foods store. you get the picture; right? [laughter] they dominate professions leaving a large cultural imprint in the country of ours, professions like journalism, arts, academia, and america's fastest growing band of entertainers, circumstance day sew lay acrobats. who are these people who call themselves liberals? how does such a small group impact our lives? what motivates them? well, i'm in an excellent position to answer the deep questions because i've been watching liberals closely for over 30 years, i studied liberal s jane goodall studies chimps in their natural habitats and without judgment, in silence mostly because we bailey speak the same language. tireless in liberals, humored them, teaseed them, prodded them, and, yes, loved some of them. best friends are liber
the close friends. stephen sorenson was more rooted in civilization. he was beloved by many locals. he, too, rescued animals as a talk about. he took care of kids in town who looked up to him. you know, he was a hero to many in the antelope valley, because he showed them a way out. a lot of the cops i met themselves could have turned into these guys out in the desert who are felons, you know, violent, but they decided, it's like a lot of the outlaws of the old west. they would come in to town, locals would hide in to clean up the town. it's like we need you, you know. so there is fat and on these incredible moments ago. been as i mentioned, the longing, what i noticed in all of my characters do and what i cannot respond to is i see that they are all longing for some connection. i'm not like that social networking. they don't want that. the human connection that most people are longing for. and that's what's driving, that's what drives all of these stories. you know, i mean come even the people who got in the wilderness and lack wildlife. something is amiss better obviously. and there's some
on this and other cities visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> antonio mendez presents his book, "argo," at the international spy museum in d.c. arco details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia officer antonio mendez hosing as a hollywood producer scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big he
to build a school on a hill, and, of course, needed the help of the locals, needed the help of the pes cants to build the -- peasants to build the school. building the school would be hard work, involved moving rocks off the top of the hill, involved cutting down trees for line lumber. it was going to involve a lot of energy and organization, and, of course, famously, in 19th century russia, peasants are not easy to organize. it's a recurring theme, of course in the great russian literary works in fact 19th century, and so the mysteries of the estates in chekov's story walks away fearing that this can never be done, the schoolhouse can never be build built, but the village blacksmith takes pity on the mysteries of the estates, follows her down the path, and says, don't worry, give if time. let them get used to the idea. maybe it'll take two years. maybe it'll take four years. maybe it'll take ten years or so, but if you let the pes cants, themselves, come around to the idea it's a good thing to have a school in this village, they will cheerfully and eagerly do the work. it is simply yo
in the local media. >> guest: well, thank you for your comment. you know, i sort of joke with friends that at times, had we just flown a bunch of military cargo planes over the country and push out big pallets filled with dollar bills we might have done more good than the billions of dollars that were spent through contractors, some contractors who hired expensive security guards and only a fraction of it actually got to the afghan people. look, i want to be clear. the afghan people need our help. the rate of malnutrition, illiteracy, infant mortality, it's off the charts in the country. they need modest, sustainable international help, and what we unfortunately tried to do doo during the troop surge was spend too much money too quickly. in 2010 we tried to spend -- we didn't do it all but we tried to spend, our government, $4 billion, that's with a b -- billion dollars on reconstruction in afghanistan, in one year. in one -- just in one little district in afghanistan, a place i visited many times. sort of a county-level type place. we wind up trying to spend more money than the per c
history published locally, a half century earlier, and 30 years after the fact when all the principles were dead. the hero is a young erie engineer who did, in fact, get the patent in 1820 for water proof cement and vigorously defended it in court. he lost a lot of money in the process including the $2,000 he paid to the true discoverer. the canal's agent for securing lime and other materials, a fellow named andrew wartow who conducted expeernlts on sample thes to get the right stone. letters and other documents reveal an arm's length deal between the two men in which wright gave barto $2,000 for the privilege of pursuing a pa tent giving him a 25% silent interest in profits from the patent at which there turned out to be known. patents were hard to defend in those days, and the commissioners, the new york state commissioners in charge of building the canal who knew at least part of the true had no interest in any of their contractors paying any of the contractors paying royalties on the cement to make their job more expensive. the commissioner's claimed that the discovery was made in
of will and strom thurmond. in the mid-1920s when strom was living at home and edge bill and teaching at the local high school a situation developed inside the household holding to one of strom's acts of wild folly. among the large home in penn st. was a 16-year-old african-american girl named kerry butler. in october 1925 butler gave birth to a daughter who she named as he made. six months later butler's sister took us e-mailed her to pennsylvania where she was moving with her husband. she passed the child to another sister mary washington who raised if -- her as her own. as he may learn the identity of our actual mother. three years later, she met her father, strom thurmond in his law office just off the town square in edgefield. essie may's birth in october coincided with an abrupt occupational change for thurmond. he had been a schoolteacher in edgefield and the paper in augusta announces on the very day that essie as he made his he quits his job in the middle of the school year and is taken a job with a real estate firm and is going to be assigned in richmond virginia and he stays in that job
that there was a beloved local sheriff named steven sorensen had been ambushed at a trailer in a remote town near lancaster in the city where i was visiting mark. it was quite a violent incident according to the early reports and by then it was an hour to after we had heard the first sirens. there were choppers flying around and six or seven different police agencies were converging with the huge and rapidly escalating manhunt. mark turned to me and said this sounds like your kind of story. he was sort of half joking but when joshua trees are involved i'm usually right there. even though i do break for sand and the desert is often the main character i don't respond to every siren i hear and i don't do that kind of reporting even though the story "desert reckoning" and ironically enough. i guess i have with this book. which took eight years by the way. at any rate we started watching the coverage as it unfolded that afternoon and it turned out that the two main characters involved were very compelling to me. there was a dedicated hermit donald cook who was a suspect in the shooting and he had fled after amb
strom was teaching at the local high school, a situation develop inside the household, i went to one of the acts of wild folly. it was a 16-year-old african-american girl named carrie butler. in october 1925, butler gave birth to a daughter who named as they may. six months later come to sister took with her to pennsylvania where she was living with her husband. she passed the channel to another sister, mary washington, who raised me as a robe. not to she learned the identity of her actual mother and told three years later she met her father, strom thurmond and his law office just off the town square in nashville. as he made his birth with an abrupt occupational change for thurmond. he had been a schoolteacher in ashfield and the paper and it just announced on the very day as the maze born, announces he's quit his job in the middle of the school year, taken a job at the real estate firm and is going to be assigned in richmond, virginia. and he stays in that job as a real estate agent in virginia until several months until after fdma had been moved to pennsylvania. but then he comes b
it be on radio, locally, nationally, television as well. but what i find really ironic is, especially today, may be connected with your comment about celebrity culture, when you look at certain so-called news organizations, fox, cnn, the women and the guys, it's both, one in the same, they are airheads. they really are. i'm saying the guys, too. and it bothers me so much knowing in particular that women are executive producers, and i wonder if, you know, the experience you've had and the people you know are putting any pressure on organizations like that to hire more serious journalists. you were talking earlier about print journalism. i'm wondering what thoughts you have about -- >> cable-television, to everything else but it's like radio talk show. you have to say come you can't you say the media. if you're talking to cable television, that's a completely different animal than what network news or npr or public television or anything. so, you know, you're dealing with a very small audience that has a, it's only like under 2 million, but they have, you know, they are both now have taken, you kn
] your local college professor. the driver of a crazy car with bush is hitler bumper stickers. [laughter] think of a check out help with the master's degree of gender studies with the headband at the whole foods store. [laughter] they dominate professions that leave an imprint in this great country. paternalism, arts, academia, the music industry, and america's fastest growing entertainers cirque du soleil acrobats. who are these people that call themselves liberals? to lose such a big impact? what motivates them? lake in answer these the questions. i have been watching him closely over 30 years like jane goodall studies champs champs -- chimpanzees in their natural habitats without judgment. [laughter] in silence mostly we barely speak the same language. i have been tireless i have broke bread with them coming humored comedies, it imitated and even love to some of them. some of my best friends are liberals are part of my family. my commitment to understanding the roles some question mental-health. but i read "the new yorker" magazine. i went to see "the vagina monologues." i listened tw
to your local bookstore or to any of the online services to get a copy. it is published by basic books. stuart taylor is an author and free-lance journalist focusing on legal and policy issues, he also writes for national journal, a contributing editor, he is a stanford law school lecturer and occasionally a practicing lawyer. he is a nonresident at brookings institution. his current focus is on constitutional law, media law and the supreme court. he has been a senior writer for american lawyer media. he is as distinguished lecturer in writing that concern university, reporter in supreme court correspondent for the new york times and an attorney with wilbur cut their and graduate of princeton university and harvard law school please welcome stuart taylor. [applause] >> thank you very much. please accept my heartfelt thanks for giving us this opportunity to talk about a new book. i am going to focus more on the case in the supreme court and i will talk a little bit about the relevance of our book's evidence about "mismatch" etc. to the case. this case, we didn't know about this case whe
this weekend as booktv, american history tv and c-span local content vehicles look behind the history and literary life of augusta, maine on booktv on c-span2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> here's a look at the upcoming book fairs and festivals happening around the country. the seattle aquarium book fair will take place october 13th and fourteenth focusing on rare books, prints and photographs. this is the twentieth anniversary. the west virginia book festival in charleston is on october 13th and fourteenth. the author of a series of books that hbo's truth blood is based on will be featured. on october 14th, the three day 7 festival of books in nashville, tenn. featuring many well-known authors in every genre of writing. on october 27, 1028, we attended texas book festival in austin. this event started in 1995 by first lady laura bush and is held at the state capitol building. please let us know about book fairs and festivals in your area and we will lead them to our list. e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. wall street journal reporter r kirsten brind ta
was more of a pilgrimage and in a little bit on according to the local people. but she got her way, she ran on two separate missions, to see the captain tried to get him to let her cry. at that point, he gave her a go-ahead. what are of the things as a historian is that i have to feel the places that i study. i tried to trace all of her visits, not on horseback, but he by either going to all of the places that she went, trying to get a sense of the kind of journey that she made. she went 11 days through enemy territory controlled by england just to get to the future area. so the fact that she was willing to do that as a 17-year-old girl is astonishing to me. once she was given the seal of approval, even gynecological to make sure she was pure and a good catholic, she was finally fitted with armor, which by the way, i tried on versions of it myself and it is astonishing that a 17 year old could wear armor, said sit on a horse, have a standard and that's all they want her to do. she would fight the english that way because they had been besieged for about six months at a time. when they final
into that more during the question and answer session but this is not a problem that local would. at some point i'll have a hard or soft land but at some point of people will be free. the question mark assembly people will need to die before we get to the point? the more we do now, the lower that number will be because there is no question at all in somewhat and a big way, it would be the issue for everyone in the region if not the world to deal with at some point. so i would just like to in by saying those of us that have the privilege of being born free or having earned our freedom are managed to somehow accidentally live in a free place, have a special responsibility to help those that are still not there. these people are the closest thing to just complete complacent in everything but even if they made to china they get such a traffic. 70%. they are often detained, arrested and sent back. we have stories about people having wires put through their noses or ears in order to have been sent back in mass. is easy to get jaded that it is that bad. we we could be her for hours. i think that points
to provide solutions. i think it's important that people realize even in an age of local despotism, you have to still live a full and free life and whenever you can. and so this is one of the solutions i said just for young people is get to work and find a place you can volunteer your efforts and integrate yourself because it is going to come at some point he will be on your own and you will be out of that show of government schooling and you will have to provide for yourself and for your loved ones. >> jeffrey where did the title bourbon for breakfast come from? >> it came from a very surprising event in my life. i went to breakfast with a very old scholar in the university who was an expert in greek and latin who'd written a book on the old testament and one of these old southern gentleman and the first thing he said this would you like a cup of coffee? sure. would you like bourbon and that coffee? a shot? what is he doing drinking in the morning? it's like a taboo. what an interesting context. this old scholar, a southern gentleman, by a leading of the great social taboos of drinking in t
billion worth of local infrastructure projects. it was like a stimulus tucked inside a stimulus and no one noticed it. i spent a lot of time explaining how the stimulus launch the clean energy revolution, redoubling renewable power, and governing the domestic industry for electric vehicles from scratch, jump starting the smart grid, etc.. we have reduced our dependence on foreign oil to the lowest level since 95 and carbon emissions are dropping even though the economy is growing. all you hear about is the solyndra scandal which isn't even a scandal. it is supposed to stimulate -- symbolize solar power is a mirage. mitt romney called it imaginary but thanks to the stimulus solar installations increased 600% since 2008. obviously the recount -- the economy is struggling and it is fair to point out obama and his recovery act have not lived up to the initial-but nothing in life except parents live up to the height. did i mention mitt romney? i think i did. he put the stimulus at the center of his presidential campaign which is totally appropriate. there ought to be a great debate about govern
that various branches of state and local government must conduct security investigations of individuals on various campuses at the university of california especially where they take part in classified contract. with this background in mind the following is being brought to the attention of the bureau. merely for its information in the event that the bureau may have some inquiry involving dr. kirk who is at best a highly controversial figure of california education. that is 1958. a few years later there is another document which even more pointedly expressedes j. edgar hoover's view of clark kerr. this is dated march 20, 1961. it concerns a visit to the campus of someone named frank wilkinson who had been a housing official in los angeles and had been called to testify before the house un-american activities committee and refused. wilkinson was going to come to the campus and give a speech. certain people were very unhappy about this. this memo summarizes that and we see on the last page hoover's handwriting and his characteristic jagged score all, he writes i am absolutely opposed to t
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